Tobacco Habits, Oral Mucosal Lesions and Counselling Provided to Support Staff of Educational Institutions Situated in Greater Noida, Uttar Pradesh, India: A Cross-Sectional Study

  • Pankaj Nagar
  • Lily Abraham
  • Irina Bhati
Keywords: Tobacco, Cessation, Relapse

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Tobacco has approximately one billion users and claims the life of one person every six seconds on an average. AIM: To assess the tobacco habits and related oral mucosal lesions and tobacco cessation counselling provided to the support staff of various educational schools situated in Greater Noida, Uttar Pradesh, India. MATERIALS AND METHOD: Data was collected in two steps. The first step included data collection using the Global Adult Tobacco Survey (GATS), 2011 which was modified according to the needs of the population. The second step included recording of Oral Mucosal Lesions through the “Oral Mucosa” component of the WHO Oral Health Assessment Form(1997) by a standardized investigator. Data was tabulated and the student’s t-test and Spearman’s correlation were applied to find out significant associations, if any. Data was analysed using SPSS version 21.0 and p was kept significant at ≤0.05. RESULTS: Tobacco consumption in any form was found in 47.1% subjects consisting of 37 males (90.2%)and 4 females (9.8%). Smoking was found in 16 subjects (18.4%) comprising of 13 males (14.9%) and 3 females(3.4%). Lesions were observed in 58.5% of the population, with the most common lesion being leucoplakia (27%), followed by any other lesion (24%) and malignant lesions (7%). A positive correlation was observed in three variables; the first being an increased willingness to quit with increased current consumption (r=0.67), followed by willingness to quit due to presence of a lesion (r=0.71) and willingness to quit due to provision of any type of counselling (r=0.70). CONCLUSION: It is important that efforts are directed towards reducing and subsequently eliminating tobacco consumption among support staff of various educational schools who have a high percentage of tobacco intake.

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.

Author Biographies

Pankaj Nagar

GNM, Private Nursing Practitioner, Greater Noida, India

Lily Abraham

MDS (Orthodontics), Dharan, Nepal

Irina Bhati

GNM, Private Nursing Practitioner, Greater Noida, India

References

World Health Organisation. Tobacco Free Initiative (TFI): Tobacco facts. (Online Article). Available at: http://www.who.int/tobacco/mpower/tobaccofacts/en/ . [Last accessed on 15th December. 2020]

Sinha DN, Gupta PC, Pednekar MS. Tobacco Use In A Rural Area Of Bihar, India. Indian Journal of Community Medicine 2003;28(4):167-70.

Chinwong D, Mookmanee N, Chongpornchai J, Chinwong S. A Comparison of Gender Differences in Smoking Behaviors, Intention to Quit, and Nicotine Dependence among Thai University Students. J Addict. 2018 Oct 24;2018:8081670. https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/8081670.

Smith PH, Bessette AJ, Weinberger AH, Sheffer CE, McKee SA. Sex/gender differences in smoking cessation: A review. Prev Med. 2016;92:135-40. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ypmed.2016.07.013.

Yue Y, Hong L, Guo L, Gao X, Deng J, Huang J, et al. Gender differences in the association between cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption and depressive symptoms: a cross-sectional study among Chinese adolescents. Sci Rep. 2016;5:17959. https://doi.org/10.1038/srep17959

Patil PB, Bathi R, Chaudhari S. Prevalence of oral mucosal lesions in dental patients with tobacco smoking, chewing, and mixed habits: A cross-sectional study in South India. J Family Community Med. 2013;20(2):130–5. https://doi.org/10.4103/2230-8229.114777

Mathew AL, Pai KM, Sholapurkar AA, Vengal M. The prevalence of oral mucosal lesions in patients visiting a dental school in Southern India. Indian J Dent Res. 2008;19(2):99-103.

Chandroth SV, Venugopal HK, Puthenveetil S, Jayaram A, Mathews J, Suresh N et al. Prevalence of oral mucosal lesions among fishermen of Kutch coast, Gujarat, India. Int Marit Health. 2014;65(4):192-8. https://doi.org/10.5603/IMH.2014.0037.

Bhatnagar P, Rai S, Bhatnagar G, Kaur M, Goel S, Prabhat M. Prevalence study of oral mucosal lesions, mucosal variants, and treatment required for patients reporting to a dental school in North India: In accordance with WHO guidelines. Journal of Family & Community Medicine 2013;20(1):41-48. https://doi.org/10.4103/2230-8229.108183.

Global Adult Tobacco Survey Collaborative Group. Tobacco Questions for Surveys: A Subset of Key Questions from the Global Adult Tobacco Survey (GATS), 2nd Edition. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2011

World Health Organization. (‎1997)‎. Oral health surveys : basic methods, 4th ed. World Health Organization. https://apps.who.int/iris/handle/10665/41905

IBM Corp. Released 2012. IBM SPSS Statistics for Windows, Version 21.0. Armonk, NY: IBM Corp.

Bhan N, Karan A, Srivastava S, Selvaraj S, Subramanian SV, Millett C. Have Socioeconomic Inequalities in Tobacco Use in India Increased Over Time? Trends From the National Sample Surveys (2000-2012). Nicotine Tob Res. 2016;18(8):1711-8. https://doi.org/10.1093/ntr/ntw092.

Mbulo L, Palipudi KM, Smith T, Yin S, Munish VG, Sinha DN, Gupta PC, Swasticharan L. Patterns and related factors of bidi smoking in India. Tob Prev Cessat. 2020;6:28. https://doi.org/10.18332/tpc/119053.

Garrett BE, Martell BN, Caraballo RS, King BA. Socioeconomic Differences in Cigarette Smoking Among Sociodemographic Groups. Prev Chronic Dis. 2019;16:180553. DOI: http://doi.org/10.5888/pcd16.180553

Jindal SK, Aggarwal AN, Chaudhry K, Chhabra SK, D'Souza GA, Gupta D, et al. Asthma Epidemiology Study Group. Tobacco smoking in India: prevalence, quit-rates and respiratory morbidity. Indian J Chest Dis Allied Sci. 2006;48(1):37-42.

Kar SS, Sivanantham P, Rehman T, Chinnakali P, Thiagarajan S. Willingness to quit tobacco and its correlates among Indian tobacco users-Findings from the Global Adult Tobacco Survey India, 2016-17. J Postgrad Med. 2020;66(3):141-148. https://doi.org/10.4103/jpgm.JPGM_408_19.

Srivastava S, Malhotra, S., Harries, A.D. et al. Correlates of tobacco quit attempts and cessation in the adult population of India: secondary analysis of the Global Adult Tobacco Survey, 2009–10. BMC Public Health 13, 263 (2013). https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2458-13-263

Reddy MM, Kanungo S, Naik BN, Kar SS. Willingness to quit tobacco smoking and its correlates among Indian smokers – Findings from Global Adult Tobacco Survey India, 2009–2010. J Family Med Prim Care 2018;7:1353-60. https://doi.org/10.4103/jfmpc.jfmpc_169_18

Chandra P, Govindraju P. Prevalence of oral mucosal lesions among tobacco users. Oral Health Prev Dent. 2012;10(2):149-53.

Aslesh OP, Paul S, Paul L, Jayasree A K. High Prevalence of Tobacco Use and Associated Oral Mucosal Lesion Among Interstate Male Migrant Workers in Urban Kerala, India, Int J Cancer Manag. 2015 ; 8(6):e3876. https://doi.org/10.17795/ijcp-3876.

CITATION
DOI: 10.26440/IHRJ/0504.07440
Published: 2021-07-29
How to Cite
1.
Pankaj Nagar, Lily Abraham, Irina Bhati. Tobacco Habits, Oral Mucosal Lesions and Counselling Provided to Support Staff of Educational Institutions Situated in Greater Noida, Uttar Pradesh, India: A Cross-Sectional Study. IHRJ [Internet]. 2021Jul.29 [cited 2023Feb.2];5(4):OR5-OR10. Available from: https://ihrjournal.com/ihrj/article/view/440
Section
Original Research(s)